News
5/26/2010
08:53 AM
George Crump
George Crump
Commentary
50%
50%

Tape and Disk Better Together

I have seen a few surveys recently that tape penetration in data centers remains very high, less than 15% of data centers have become tapeless, of course that means that 85% of environments still have tape. In my conversations with IT managers most are planning to keep it. Most see the role of disk in the backup process to augment or at best compliment tape. What's needed then is a way to make tape and disk better together.

I have seen a few surveys recently that tape penetration in data centers remains very high, less than 15% of data centers have become tapeless, of course that means that 85% of environments still have tape. In my conversations with IT managers most are planning to keep it. Most see the role of disk in the backup process to augment or at best compliment tape. What's needed then is a way to make tape and disk better together.With each generation tape just gets faster. The challenge is, as you probably know all too well, is that if you can't keep a tape saturated with data, the time it takes to slow the drive down, wait for data and then speed back up can extract a serious performance penalty. Disk is more forgiving. Disks' challenge, although improved with technologies like deduplication and compression, is it is still more expensive than tape. With LTO-5 tape is now about $50 per TB. The most competitive disk systems, even with full deduplication and compression, are typically around $1 to $2 per GB or $1,000 per TB.

The disk price erosion, helped by technology, has certainly made disk a viable short term backup destination and especially because of technology, has make it an option to consider for medium term (~ 7 years) archive. Disk is more forgiving of variable backup performance than tape is, plus it has the perceived advantage of better accessibility because of its file system like nature. Although as we discuss in our article "What is LTFS?" we think that tape as a file system may remove that advantage.

Given these realities can tape and disk be better together? Disk can be simply used as a front end cache to tape. By queuing up large sections of backup on disk first, tape can then be streamed at full speed. This keeps the disk capacity investment down and tape speed up. If handling most recoveries from disk is a goal the cache can be sized up a bit, but typically this is when backup managers will look to a disk system designed specifically at being a backup target, which will also mean adding capabilities like scalability, deduplication and/or compression. The challenge with many of these devices is their integration with tape or lack there of.

Ideally what is needed is an abstraction layer that makes the backup target separate from the software. In some cases the backup software itself can provide the abstraction layer meshing the different backup targets into a single managed infrastructure. Of course that this means selecting only one backup application for the enterprise. For most data centers having only one backup solution sounds nice but is not sustainable, there are almost always a collection of "one-off" data protection processes. Alternatively the abstraction can be done by an appliance allowing multiple backup applications to virtually see whatever device they prefer yet have the appliance manage all the actual back end devices. This would allow a selection of backup targets based on need instead of by application support.

Track us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/storageswiss

Subscribe to our RSS feed.

George Crump is lead analyst of Storage Switzerland, an IT analyst firm focused on the storage and virtualization segments. Find Storage Switzerland's disclosure statement here.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
10 Recommendations for Outsourcing Security
10 Recommendations for Outsourcing Security
Enterprises today have a wide range of third-party options to help improve their defenses, including MSSPs, auditing and penetration testing, and DDoS protection. But are there situations in which a service provider might actually increase risk?
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2011-4403
Published: 2015-04-24
Multiple cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerabilities in Zen Cart 1.3.9h allow remote attackers to hijack the authentication of administrators for requests that (1) delete a product via a delete_product_confirm action to product.php or (2) disable a product via a setflag action to categories.ph...

CVE-2012-2930
Published: 2015-04-24
Multiple cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerabilities in TinyWebGallery (TWG) before 1.8.8 allow remote attackers to hijack the authentication of administrators for requests that (1) add a user via an adduser action to admin/index.php or (2) conduct static PHP code injection attacks in .htusers...

CVE-2012-2932
Published: 2015-04-24
Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in TinyWebGallery (TWG) before 1.8.8 allow remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the (1) selitems[] parameter in a copy, (2) chmod, or (3) arch action to admin/index.php or (4) searchitem parameter in a search action to admin/...

CVE-2012-5451
Published: 2015-04-24
Multiple stack-based buffer overflows in HttpUtils.dll in TVMOBiLi before 2.1.0.3974 allow remote attackers to cause a denial of service (tvMobiliService service crash) via a long string in a (1) GET or (2) HEAD request to TCP port 30888.

CVE-2015-0297
Published: 2015-04-24
Red Hat JBoss Operations Network 3.3.1 does not properly restrict access to certain APIs, which allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary Java methos via the (1) ServerInvokerServlet or (2) SchedulerService or (3) cause a denial of service (disk consumption) via the ContentManager.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Join security and risk expert John Pironti and Dark Reading Editor-in-Chief Tim Wilson for a live online discussion of the sea-changing shift in security strategy and the many ways it is affecting IT and business.