News
4/22/2008
02:47 AM
Terry Sweeney
Terry Sweeney
Commentary
50%
50%

Crank Up The Volume

If storage were an audio receiver, we'd be flirting with that "9" or "10" mark on that big black dial. But we're talking capacity here (and maybe speed), as vendors appear to bend the rules of physics by cramming more bytes than any space or drive should be able to accommodate.

If storage were an audio receiver, we'd be flirting with that "9" or "10" mark on that big black dial. But we're talking capacity here (and maybe speed), as vendors appear to bend the rules of physics by cramming more bytes than any space or drive should be able to accommodate.Western Digital says its new 2.5-inch drive has twice the capacity and a 35% performance increase over the last generation of hard drives. Gotta do something about the name, though: VelociRaptor, an homage, I guess, to those rapacious, avian reptiles from Jurassic Park. ("We tear your bytes to bits!") Powerful visual, maybe not such a nice outcome ... another parallel to the movie.

Hitachi Global Storage Technologies also got into the volume act with enterprise-class hard drives and its Ultrastar 15K450 which taps perpendicular magnetic recording for 450 GB of storage.

Average seek times on the new Ultrastar are alleged to be as low as 3.3 milliseconds, and average latency as low as 2 milliseconds, perfect for critical data center applications, online transaction processing, and multiuser applications, the vendor said. The new Ultrastars come with either 3-Gbps serial attached SCSI or a 4-Gbps Fibre Channel interfaces. But if speed is all, why not goose 'em up to 8-Gbps Fibre Channel?

And it's not a perfect analog where volume or capacity is concerned, but a bit of holographic storage is getting ready for its debut next month. Storage Mojo reports InPhase is taking the wraps off optical storage that's been eight years in the making.

With 300-GB capacity and 20-MB per second transfer speeds, the pricey media is apparently aimed at those who need 50-year archiving guarantees. We'll see if it escapes the niche-ification that plagues so much other storage pioneering.

In the meantime, storage buyers will keep their hands on the volume dial -- unlike decibels, you can never have too much storage capacity overhead. Whether you can actually afford it is another matter.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Flash Poll
10 Recommendations for Outsourcing Security
10 Recommendations for Outsourcing Security
Enterprises today have a wide range of third-party options to help improve their defenses, including MSSPs, auditing and penetration testing, and DDoS protection. But are there situations in which a service provider might actually increase risk?
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2015-4497
Published: 2015-08-29
Use-after-free vulnerability in the CanvasRenderingContext2D implementation in Mozilla Firefox before 40.0.3 and Firefox ESR 38.x before 38.2.1 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code by leveraging improper interaction between resize events and changes to Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) token...

CVE-2015-4498
Published: 2015-08-29
The add-on installation feature in Mozilla Firefox before 40.0.3 and Firefox ESR 38.x before 38.2.1 allows remote attackers to bypass an intended user-confirmation requirement by constructing a crafted data: URL and triggering navigation to an arbitrary http: or https: URL at a certain early point i...

CVE-2014-9651
Published: 2015-08-28
Buffer overflow in CHICKEN 4.9.0.x before 4.9.0.2, 4.9.x before 4.9.1, and before 5.0 allows attackers to have unspecified impact via a positive START argument to the "substring-index[-ci] procedures."

CVE-2015-1171
Published: 2015-08-28
Stack-based buffer overflow in GSM SIM Utility (aka SIM Card Editor) 6.6 allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code via a long entry in a .sms file.

CVE-2015-2987
Published: 2015-08-28
Type74 ED before 4.0 misuses 128-bit ECB encryption for small files, which makes it easier for attackers to obtain plaintext data via differential cryptanalysis of a file with an original length smaller than 128 bits.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Another Black Hat is in the books and Dark Reading was there. Join the editors as they share their top stories, biggest lessons, and best conversations from the premier security conference.