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6/14/2018
10:15 AM
Jai Vijayan
Jai Vijayan
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Containerized Apps: An 8-Point Security Checklist

Here are eight measures to take to ensure the security of your containerized application environment.
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Image Source: Sheila Fitzgerald via Shutterstock

Image Source: Sheila Fitzgerald via Shutterstock

Containers allow applications to be abstracted from the underlying infrastructure on which they run. They give developers a way to package applications into smaller chunks that can run on different servers, thereby making them easier to deploy, maintain, and update.

But securing containerized applications requires a somewhat different approach compared with securing traditional application environments. That's because they are a bit harder to scan for security vulnerabilities, the images on which they are built are often unverified, and standardization in the space is still evolving. Importantly, containers also can be spun up and down quickly, making them somewhat ephemeral in nature from a security standpoint.

"Even though container technology may be a new concept to companies deploying them, the idea behind them should be familiar," says Kirsten Newcomer, senior principal product manager, security at Red Hat.

Organizations need to think about security through the application stack both before deploying a container and throughout its life cycle. "While containers inherit many of the security features of Linux, there are some specific issues that need to be considered when it comes to the model," Newcomer says.

Following are eight items that need to be on any organization's security checklist when deploying containers.

 

Jai Vijayan is a seasoned technology reporter with over 20 years of experience in IT trade journalism. He was most recently a Senior Editor at Computerworld, where he covered information security and data privacy issues for the publication. Over the course of his 20-year ... View Full Bio

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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
6/23/2018 | 6:30:32 PM
Hypervisors?
Maybe this goes without saying, or possibly falls under config issues, but I would probably add that they be run on top of hypervisors for maximum tenancy security/isolation.
PaulChau
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PaulChau,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/19/2018 | 11:40:32 PM
Accountability
I imagine that there are some sort of RFID applications to this sort of bulk storage container management operations. Considering how much logistics there is to managing all of these moving parts in a shipping industry, I'm pretty sure that the owners of such businesses would want to ensure that there are better measures put in place to keep track of everything that moves in and out of the harbours! It's not just about security but accountability and profit too!
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