Risk

Dataium Settles Browser History Sniffing Charges

The car buyer tracking firm was accused of using JavaScript to illegally identify websites visited by 181,000 named consumers, and selling harvested information.

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Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
11/27/2013 | 7:48:42 AM
Re: Rare glimpse
 How much tracking are you willing to trade for useful websites? 

That's a hard question to answer in the dark. The Dataium case puts a spotlight on how little consumers know about the behind-the-scenes tracking that goes on. I think we're all well aware that Amazon has algorithms that tells us what books or products we might be interested in. But there needs to be greater transparency about the extent to which companies are sharing that information with partners. 
Mathew
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Mathew,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/27/2013 | 4:52:24 AM
Re: Rare glimpse
One of the chilling aspects is that just by searching for cars online, even if you haven't registered on a website, data brokers -- including the likes of Equifax, TransUnion, and Experian, which recently confirmed a massive data breach at a subsidiary -- are not only seeing that information, but likely adding it to records that include your real name, address, email addresses, phone numbers, shopping preferences, financial details, and more. 

Furthemore, if that's the case for cars, then by extension every click you make on every website might be getting tracked in the same manner. All of which raises the question of how much tracking are you willing to trade for useful websites? 
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
11/26/2013 | 2:43:18 PM
Rare glimpse
Fascinating story  & the details are indeed a rare glimpse into the extent of data mining that takes place unbeknown to most consumers. Hats off to the NJ AG's office for pursuing this!
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