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What The Feds Said At RSA

A look at some of the insights top US government officials from the White House, DoD, NSA, FBI, and other agencies shared at the RSA Conference in San Francisco last month.
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Source: iStock
Source: iStock

US government officials were all over the RSA Conference this year--many as guest speakers and panelists—including White House cybersecurity coordinator Michael Daniel, Secretary of Defense Ash Carter, and various officials from the Department of Homeland Security, the FBI, NSA, and the US Secret Service.

If there was one theme that their talks and comments had in common, it was that they were all keen on demonstrating a more open government that really gets that it must partner with the cybersecurity industry. That means declassifying and sharing more of its own threat intelligence, working more closely with organizations hit by cyberattacks (and before they’re in full incident response mode), and closer ties to the researcher community.

As Defense Secretary Ash Carter put it when announcing the department's unprecedented bug bounty pilot at the RSA Conference, DoD technologists need to “think outside the five-sided box.”

Here’s a look at what some of the federal government officials said at RSA that shows they may well be thinking outside the Nation’s Capital in their cybersecurity policies and efforts.



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Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/27/2016 | 11:33:37 AM
New Dept?
I wonder if Daniel's (et al.) comments suggest a paving of the way for a Department of Cybersecurity or something of the like (which, at this point, I'm not sure is a bad idea; DoD and Homeland could certainly stand to have some help).
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