Cloud

6/1/2016
05:00 PM
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Ransomware Domains Up By 3,500% In Q1

Cybercriminals know a good thing when they see it.

In just one quarter, researchers have observed a 35-fold jump in new domains created for ransomware. The recent surge means that ransomware-related domains now account the majority of new domains related to malware (excluding exploit kits), according to the new report by Infoblox.

Infoblox partly attributes the burst of new ransomware activity -- and actors -- to the fact that it has already proven to be so successful. "What has changed ... over the past quarter or two is a shift from small-money heists targeting consumers to larger, more profitable attacks on commercial entities," the report states. The biggest culprit: Locky, the ransoware that was reportedly responsible for the costly attack on a Los Angeles hospital.

Despite the huge leap in ransomware, neither it alone nor even the entire malware category account for the most malicious domains. That prize goes to exploit kits -- which beat out malware, phishing, DDoS, and data exfiltration attack-related domains for the dubious honor. Exploit kits account for nearly 50% of Infoblox's DNS Threat Index, which measures the level of malicious domain creation, excluding domain generation algorithms and sub-domain resellers.

Angler remains the top dog of the exploit kits (for seven quarters running), but RIG jumped to second place, and Neutrino, which has always hovered near the bottom of the pile, tripled its share of the EK market (18%).

Infoblox's last noteworthy finding was that "much like cockroaches that scurry from the light, cybercriminals are quick to shift to a more advantageous location as needed." Meaning in this case that criminals have shifted the physical location of much of their malicious DNS infrastructure. Although the lion's share continues to be in the US (though it has dropped), nearly all of the infrastructure has been moved out of Germany -- dropping from about 20%  to less than 2%. In its place, Portugal, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, Iceland, and the Russian Federation, now collectively account for half of the malicious infrastructure. 

Related Content:

 

Sara Peters is Senior Editor at Dark Reading and formerly the editor-in-chief of Enterprise Efficiency. Prior that she was senior editor for the Computer Security Institute, writing and speaking about virtualization, identity management, cybersecurity law, and a myriad ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
defenderAlex
50%
50%
defenderAlex,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/6/2016 | 5:40:00 AM
locky ransomware
Given the fact how quickly changes Locky ransomware, I think soon he will come to the fore. And that's bad news. Necessary preventive measures and backup!
theb0x
100%
0%
theb0x,
User Rank: Ninja
6/3/2016 | 10:55:32 AM
That's not that much...
Because the fact that the domain registration process can be completely scripted and automated this does not shock me at all.
WebAuthn, FIDO2 Infuse Browsers, Platforms with Strong Authentication
John Fontana, Standards & Identity Analyst, Yubico,  9/19/2018
NSS Labs Files Antitrust Suit Against Symantec, CrowdStrike, ESET, AMTSO
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  9/19/2018
Turn the NIST Cybersecurity Framework into Reality: 5 Steps
Mukul Kumar & Anupam Sahai, CISO & VP of Cyber Practice and VP Product Management, Cavirin Systems,  9/20/2018
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: Are you sure this is how we get our data into the cloud?
Current Issue
Flash Poll
The Risk Management Struggle
The Risk Management Struggle
The majority of organizations are struggling to implement a risk-based approach to security even though risk reduction has become the primary metric for measuring the effectiveness of enterprise security strategies. Read the report and get more details today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-14633
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-25
A security flaw was found in the chap_server_compute_md5() function in the ISCSI target code in the Linux kernel in a way an authentication request from an ISCSI initiator is processed. An unauthenticated remote attacker can cause a stack buffer overflow and smash up to 17 bytes of the stack. The at...
CVE-2018-14647
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-25
Python's elementtree C accelerator failed to initialise Expat's hash salt during initialization. This could make it easy to conduct denial of service attacks against Expat by contructing an XML document that would cause pathological hash collisions in Expat's internal data structures, consuming larg...
CVE-2018-10502
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-24
This vulnerability allows local attackers to escalate privileges on vulnerable installations of Samsung Galaxy Apps Fixed in version 4.2.18.2. An attacker must first obtain the ability to execute low-privileged code on the target system in order to exploit this vulnerability. The specific flaw exist...
CVE-2018-11614
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-24
This vulnerability allows remote attackers to escalate privileges on vulnerable installations of Samsung Members Fixed in version 2.4.25. An attacker must first obtain the ability to execute low-privileged code on the target system in order to exploit this vulnerability. The specific flaw exists wit...
CVE-2018-14318
PUBLISHED: 2018-09-24
This vulnerability allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code on vulnerable installations of Samsung Galaxy S8 G950FXXU1AQL5. User interaction is required to exploit this vulnerability in that the target must have their cellular radios enabled. The specific flaw exists within the handling of ...