Cloud

8/5/2016
08:30 PM
Connect Directly
Facebook
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

New Internet Security Domains Debut

Meet the new .security and .protection domains.

Registry operator gen.xyz these week launched two new top-level Internet domains -- .security and .protection -- aimed at creating websites with higher security as well as a safer online experience for end users.

Registrants can use domains to reinforce a brand, organization name, service locations, or industry keywords, says Nils Decker, director of business development for gen.xyz.  

Big security players such as Norton, FireEye, and Masterlock, have already registered names with the new .security and .protection domains.  An organization in Southern California, for example, might select la.security; spam.protection could do the trick for an email filtering company. 

Early adopters of the new domains include Microsoft's office365.protection site; IBM managed security provider blue.security; arrow.security (formerly arrowsecuritycorp.com); and grupo.security (formerly security.cl).

Registrants are strongly encouraged – but not required by gen.xyz -- to use both SSL and DNSSEC to bolster security. The protocols ensure that "a website visitor that the company behind the website is a legitimate company, and that they're actually talking to who they think you're talking to, not a phisher or malicious site," Decker says.

Pricing for the new domains is relatively expensive, between $2,500 and $4,000. Decker and gen.xyz are counting on that high price point to discourage spammers and miscreants from using the domains as covers for malicious activity or spoofing.

"If the technology creates more security awareness or makes customers more comfortable, they're more likely to succeed," says domain name expert Monte Cahn, president of Rightofthedot, which advises on top-level domain strategies. Cahn notes that he hasn't seen the details of gen.xyz's announcement, but did note that other more recently introduced domains such as .bank and .insurance, have been well-received. However, those domains also come with special registration forms to verify that would-be registrants are in fact part of the industries they say they are, Cahn notes.

Decker says gen.xyz isn't doing any verification itself, but rather leaving that up to SSL providers such as Symantec or Comodo. "At a high level, we are the registry operator, so we control the name space, but don't sell the names themselves," Decker says. "End-user companies go to GoDaddy or Web.com for that."

Because the domains are so new and considered premium domains, availability is quite good, Decker says, in contrast to .com or .org, which are much more picked over.

 

Terry Sweeney is a Los Angeles-based writer and editor who has covered technology, networking, and security for more than 20 years. He was part of the team that started Dark Reading and has been a contributor to The Washington Post, Crain's New York Business, Red Herring, ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
clipartsgram
50%
50%
clipartsgram,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/31/2016 | 10:09:38 PM
Re: Clipart
yeah! I agree with you.This post very benefit for everyone.
T Sweeney
50%
50%
T Sweeney,
User Rank: Moderator
10/17/2016 | 12:08:21 PM
Re: Identity theft
It's a good reminder that these new domains, in and of themselves, are not inherently secure, lorraine89. Humans still need to add basic protections and anonymizing features, like the ones you've suggested.
lorraine89
50%
50%
lorraine89,
User Rank: Ninja
10/17/2016 | 11:54:09 AM
Identity theft
New domains are pretty much vulnerable to data theft. That is why it is important to deploy some good security software and hide your IP using a genuine vpn server like PureVPN. 
lorraine89
50%
50%
lorraine89,
User Rank: Ninja
9/19/2016 | 9:38:58 AM
online security
Great article. I always take extra caution in maintaining my online privacy and security. I deploy vpn server, purevpn, to maintain my online integrity and to avoid any type of scams and phishy threats. 
Shantaram
50%
50%
Shantaram,
User Rank: Ninja
9/15/2016 | 5:00:16 AM
192.168.l.l
This article gives the light in which we can observe the reality. This is very nice one and gives in-depth information. Thanks for this nice article
showtime33
50%
50%
showtime33,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/22/2016 | 9:31:04 AM
Re: The Irony of It
Finally....some smarts about TLD's.  Exactly right, a new domain name is just another thing to block.  Making it harder to defend by adding extensions to block.  Ask people that fix pc's in the trenches and you will find that .biz, .casino,..etc... is just another way to launch a malware link to compromise a pc.  Malware can still use .security to launch randsomware for example.  duh...adding them does nothing for protection for anyone. The irony is right....lol
umutarcn
50%
50%
umutarcn,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/9/2016 | 11:31:05 PM
Quotes
Thanks, for the information on SSL and domain details.
SEO..
50%
50%
SEO..,
User Rank: Apprentice
8/9/2016 | 11:40:49 AM
Does it really matter to have .com
Thanks, for the information on SSL. On other hand, recently I read an atricle which said it's no more important to have domain as .com it can be anything google no more consider much weightage on this domain scenario. I am planning to buy one as a web designer - let me know your thought's  
JulietteRizkallah
50%
50%
JulietteRizkallah,
User Rank: Ninja
8/9/2016 | 10:16:52 AM
Re: Worth a try
Yes agreed as well, one protection or measure is never enough.  I am looking at it more as an additional potential measure.
T Sweeney
50%
50%
T Sweeney,
User Rank: Moderator
8/9/2016 | 10:11:41 AM
Re: Worth a try
Agreed, Juliette... but a simple domain in and of itself will not convey security on a website or its visitors. Regardless of what your domain is, there's plenty that still needs to happen on the backend to lock down and protect hardware, data and users.
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
It Takes an Average of 3 to 6 Months to Fill a Cybersecurity Job
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  3/12/2019
New Mirai Version Targets Business IoT Devices
Dark Reading Staff 3/19/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win a Starbucks Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: LOL  Hope this one wins
Current Issue
5 Emerging Cyber Threats to Watch for in 2019
Online attackers are constantly developing new, innovative ways to break into the enterprise. This Dark Reading Tech Digest gives an in-depth look at five emerging attack trends and exploits your security team should look out for, along with helpful recommendations on how you can prevent your organization from falling victim.
Flash Poll
The State of Cyber Security Incident Response
The State of Cyber Security Incident Response
Organizations are responding to new threats with new processes for detecting and mitigating them. Here's a look at how the discipline of incident response is evolving.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-6149
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-18
An unquoted search path vulnerability was identified in Lenovo Dynamic Power Reduction Utility prior to version 2.2.2.0 that could allow a malicious user with local access to execute code with administrative privileges.
CVE-2018-15509
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-18
Five9 Agent Desktop Plus 10.0.70 has Incorrect Access Control (issue 2 of 2).
CVE-2018-20806
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-17
Phamm (aka PHP LDAP Virtual Hosting Manager) 0.6.8 allows XSS via the login page (the /public/main.php action parameter).
CVE-2019-5616
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-15
CircuitWerkes Sicon-8, a hardware device used for managing electrical devices, ships with a web-based front-end controller and implements an authentication mechanism in JavaScript that is run in the context of a user's web browser.
CVE-2018-17882
PUBLISHED: 2019-03-15
An Integer overflow vulnerability exists in the batchTransfer function of a smart contract implementation for CryptoBotsBattle (CBTB), an Ethereum token. This vulnerability could be used by an attacker to create an arbitrary amount of tokens for any user.