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11/15/2018
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7 Free (or Cheap) Ways to Increase Your Cybersecurity Knowledge

Building cybersecurity skills is a must; paying a lot for the education is optional. Here are seven options for increasing knowledge without depleting a budget.
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Cybersecurity isn't free. Sure, there's little cost to users who follow best security practices in their day-to-day actions, but when it comes to learning how to defend against skilled criminals and set up secure systems, there's generally a cost attached. For professionals who know the basics and want to get better at their profession, costs can quickly add up. For smaller organizations, that cost can be prohibitive, but what is the alternative?

It turns out there are ways to boost knowledge and skill without dipping deeply into the operating budget for the year — and if you're a professional who wants to increase your skills, you can do it without endangering your retirement account.

The options range from free training offered by industry groups to online classes provided by major universities. Throw in training that taxes have paid for and regional gatherings, and you have an array of possibilities that can go a long way toward boosting the value and usefulness of most security pros — or those IT professionals who want to add "security" to their portfolio.

There are costs associated with many of these - and not necessarily in dollars. For instance, few of the free offerings provide certifications of class completion: If you want a (virtual) piece of paper, you'll have to pay up. And if you want the work to lead to a degree, you'll have to pay more. But even in those cases, the options in this list are likely much more affordable than most commercial training courses. At the very least, these can be a good way to brush up on skills, or a way for an IT pro to find out whether security is a path they want to tread.

(Image: Alexas_Fotos)

 

Curtis Franklin Jr. is Senior Editor at Dark Reading. In this role he focuses on product and technology coverage for the publication. In addition he works on audio and video programming for Dark Reading and contributes to activities at Interop ITX, Black Hat, INsecurity, and ... View Full Bio

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ToddF601
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ToddF601,
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11/17/2018 | 7:24:21 AM
More ways to increase knowledge
This article has a great list of online resources! There are other resources that should also be considered - 1) the resources offerred online by Industry Association memberships such as ISACA, IAPP, ISSA, and ISC2 are well worth the value of the annual membership. I would also add that spending $1000/year for books on leadership and information security should be in everyone's career development. After all, is your career worth $1,000 a year personal investment? Books provide in-depth knowledge vs today's plethora of 5 minute online videos. Each has their place in our overall development. Finally, attending local networking meetings cost little to no money and provide the opportunity to connect with other experienced practitioners.
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