Attacks/Breaches

Breach Awareness Made Easy

50%
50%

What if companies had to disclose breach history in the same way food companies display nutritional information?

Comment  | 
Print  | 
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
ODA155
0%
100%
ODA155,
User Rank: Ninja
10/9/2014 | 3:12:02 PM
Re: Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
I think you're looking for a simple solution to a very complicated problem. So, my question, who explains to the consumer what a CrossSite Scripting attack is... DDoS or SQL Injection?

Instead, I would recommend something like this, although government sponsored. If you want to get people attention they will need to know what you're talking about and if you search this DB you will see the shock value it could have if more people (consumers) were aware of its existance.

 

Chronology of Data Breaches Security Breaches 2005 - Present

https://www.privacyrights.org/data-breach

 
Sara Peters
50%
50%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
10/6/2014 | 2:09:01 PM
Re: Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
@Marilyn  Definitely hard to argue against more transparency when it comes to breaches. One thing that's going to take some time to do, though, is to educate the general public.so that they'd actually understand what the heck the data meant. Maybe things like "cross-site scripting vulnerabilities" on an app security box would only matter to IT people anyway. But a breach disclosure box for the general public would have to be a bit simpler.
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
10/6/2014 | 1:54:21 PM
Re: Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
That appsec lable, is cool, isn't it? Would be a litte trick to implemment for web apps, to be sure. But it's hard to argue against the idea of more transparency when it comes to breach disclosure.... 
Sara Peters
50%
50%
Sara Peters,
User Rank: Author
10/6/2014 | 12:47:21 PM
Re: Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
@Marilyn  Ooo I like the OWASP version with app security too. The tricky thing with doing it for Web apps is that you could only focus on the app and not the implementation on the Website, since looking for vulnerabilities on someone else's site is illegal without permission.
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
9/29/2014 | 8:02:03 AM
Re: Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
Agreed, Robert. More so, I think a public disclosure of breach history would put security right where it belongs -- on the front burner of the C-suite which sould give security teams much more clout and visibility for getting the resources they need to be proactive.
Robert McDougal
50%
50%
Robert McDougal,
User Rank: Ninja
9/28/2014 | 1:29:52 PM
Re: Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
Not only would it make the information more digestable and understandable for consumers, it would additionally drive business away from the poorest performers and shepard business to the most secure companies.   I like it.
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
9/26/2014 | 4:27:01 PM
Security Seals of approval (or disapproval)
This isn't totally analagous but Jeff Williams creator of the OWASP Top 10 came up with a similar idea for application security. I'm sure something similar could come be fashioned for data breach disclosure. Check it out: 

on security. Take a look 

 
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
5 Security Technologies to Watch in 2017
Emerging tools and services promise to make a difference this year. Are they on your company's list?
Flash Poll
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
The transition from DevOps to SecDevOps is combining with the move toward cloud computing to create new challenges - and new opportunities - for the information security team. Download this report, to learn about the new best practices for secure application development.
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2013-7445
Published: 2015-10-15
The Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) subsystem in the Linux kernel through 4.x mishandles requests for Graphics Execution Manager (GEM) objects, which allows context-dependent attackers to cause a denial of service (memory consumption) via an application that processes graphics data, as demonstrated b...

CVE-2015-4948
Published: 2015-10-15
netstat in IBM AIX 5.3, 6.1, and 7.1 and VIOS 2.2.x, when a fibre channel adapter is used, allows local users to gain privileges via unspecified vectors.

CVE-2015-5660
Published: 2015-10-15
Cross-site request forgery (CSRF) vulnerability in eXtplorer before 2.1.8 allows remote attackers to hijack the authentication of arbitrary users for requests that execute PHP code.

CVE-2015-6003
Published: 2015-10-15
Directory traversal vulnerability in QNAP QTS before 4.1.4 build 0910 and 4.2.x before 4.2.0 RC2 build 0910, when AFP is enabled, allows remote attackers to read or write to arbitrary files by leveraging access to an OS X (1) user or (2) guest account.

CVE-2015-6333
Published: 2015-10-15
Cisco Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) 1.1j allows local users to gain privileges via vectors involving addition of an SSH key, aka Bug ID CSCuw46076.

Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
In past years, security researchers have discovered ways to hack cars, medical devices, automated teller machines, and many other targets. Dark Reading Executive Editor Kelly Jackson Higgins hosts researcher Samy Kamkar and Levi Gundert, vice president of threat intelligence at Recorded Future, to discuss some of 2016's most unusual and creative hacks by white hats, and what these new vulnerabilities might mean for the coming year.