Attacks/Breaches

7/12/2018
10:00 AM
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Timehop Releases New Details About July 4 Breach

Additional information includes PII affected and the authentication issue that led to the breach.

Timehop, the company that specializes in "digital nostalgia," is releasing more information on the July 4 breach that compromised millions of users' personally identifiable information (PII). New details include the timeline of the attack, the information affected, and the steps the company has taken to remediate the issue and prevent its recurrence.

When Timehop first announced the breach, it revealed that the names and email addresses belonging to some 21 million users were illegally accessed, along with phone numbers belonging to about 22%, or 4.7 million of them. Now Timehop has released the total numbers of accounts that provided some combination of name, email address, date of birth, phone number, and gender designation to the attacker or attackers.

The company has also provided details of the authentication issue that led to the breach: It says that the account used to access the data did not have two-factor authentication enabled. Timehop now says it has required multifactor authentication on all such accounts.

Timehop has provided great transparency into the attack, its effects, and the steps being taken in its aftermath. While all customers will have to reauthenticate the service to their social media accounts (a result of authentication tokens being compromised), customers are also encouraged to learn about what happened to understand how they might be affected.

Read more here.

 

 

 

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