Attacks/Breaches

2/1/2019
01:45 PM
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Nest Hack Leaves Homeowner Sleepless in Chicago

A Chicago-area family's smart home controls were compromised in a hack that has left them feeling vulnerable in their own home.

A deep voice in a baby's room and a thermostat set to a tropical temperature were the first signs a Chicago-area homeowner had that there were problems with the home's IoT devices. When the voice followed the family into the living room, "… my blood truthfully ran cold…" the man reported.

The family's two Nest thermostats and 16 Nest cameras had been hacked by unknown threat actors. According to Google, the breach occurred because of duplicated passwords stolen from other online sites. The homeowner told a local television station that the family wasn't aware that two-factor authentication was a possibility for a Nest account. He says that the family hasn't slept well in the days since the breach and now wants to return the smart thermostats and cameras, and be reimbursed.

According to a Google statement provided to the television station reporting the breach, "We take security in the home extremely seriously, and we're actively introducing features that will reject compromised passwords, allow customers to monitor access to their accounts and track external entities that abuse credentials."

For more, read here.

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WarnR
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WarnR,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/5/2019 | 10:07:15 AM
Troubling Comments
Tho I agree the home owner should and does bare some reasonability on this issue, I do find the comments troubling. Customers, like any user in a company, relies on the Computer & Security experts to guide them. If a user in a company is not trained about not sharing passwords, or leaving a computer unlocked due to no training, is it the user's fault or the Training team for not having the mandatory training?

A few questions come to my mind reading this - was the home owner informed that they information had become compromised? That they needed to change their passwords? Is there updated announcements regarding training of new features? Do users understand or even know that systems are not 100% secure no matter what?

The comments I had read have a touch of arrogance. Being in the computer and security field we understand these things. Not all users do. If you go to a Doc for a health issue, should the doc talk down to you or make comments about how you should have known something?  
blodgettcalvin
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blodgettcalvin,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/4/2019 | 11:24:26 AM
Not secure
This situation once again shows that modern technologies, such as the Internet of Things, do not fully provide people with complete safety
mattsweet
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mattsweet,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/4/2019 | 10:39:31 AM
Subject needs to be changed
This was not a hack of Nest. This was typical enduser behavior. Google should have stated while they sympathize with the user, the user needs to be better educated to the harsh reality IoT can be and how to be responsible.

I do feel for the homeowners, though. I would be freaked out myself.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
2/4/2019 | 9:16:12 AM
Re: Very misleading title
I concur with @hhendrickson274 assessment. The fault lies with the user. I also find it interesting that even though Google did nothing wrong, they had to take the PC route with that statement. It baffles me that even in a scenario like this, a titan like Google needs to release a statement such as to try to save face from the court of public opinion. 
ameerz
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ameerz,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/4/2019 | 7:07:19 AM
Re: Very misleading title
is this just a fad article??

what supporting views r shared??
hhendrickson274
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hhendrickson274,
User Rank: Strategist
2/3/2019 | 4:08:02 PM
Very misleading title
This was not a hack of Nest at all. This was user stupidity by refusing passwords across sites/services. I especially like how the user feels it is Googles fault and they should get their money back. Please change the title, unless you meant it to be click-bait. What happened is a very real consequence of users not taking their part in information security seriously, but it was not a hack based on the limited information presented in the article. This sort of sensationalism doesnt serve to improve the state of affairs, it just perpetuates FUD.
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