Attacks/Breaches

1/24/2019
11:45 AM
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Cloud Customers Faced 681M Cyberattacks in 2018

The most common attacks involved software vulnerabilities, stolen credentials, Web applications, and IoT devices.

Cloud customers were hit with 681 million cyberattacks last year, according to analysts at cloud security provider Armor, which recently analyzed cloud attacks detected in 2018.

The most common cloud-focused threats leveraged known software vulnerabilities, involved brute-force and/or stolen credentials, targeted the Internet of Things (IoT), or aimed for Web applications with SQL injection, cross-site scripting, cross-site request forgery attacks, or remote file inclusion. Researchers based the list on volume; these are not the most advanced or lethal cloud attacks.

Yet they continue to work, are easy to access, and are fairly simple to use, they explained in a blog post on their findings. Any cybercriminal can rent an exploit kit containing attack tools for a reasonable amount of cash. For example, they said, the older and established Disdain Exploit Kit was charging rental fees starting at $80 per day, $500 per week, and $1,400 per month. Kits are designed to be accessible to cybercriminals at all levels and are constantly updated with new exploits.

"Organizations that ignore patching leave themselves open to attacks that can take time and resources away from their business and can cause a lot of damage," said Corey Milligan, senior security researcher with Armor's Threat Resistance Unit (TRU).

TRU predicts IoT attacks, DDoS campaigns, targeted ransomware, advanced phishing campaigns, and attacks targeting containers and cloud services will be prevalent in 2019.

Read more details here.

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RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2019 | 5:42:07 PM
Re: 691 M
Definitely agree, its always easier to qualify statistics if they are broken down into a regular trend, in this case by year.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2019 | 5:40:35 PM
Re: Valuable Assessment
(Around known vulnerabilities) I agree that all known vulnerabilities need to be patched but prioritizing the criticals and severes over other moderate risk vulnerabilities may make mitigation more easily digestible, especially for organizations that are just starting to put together a program.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2019 | 5:38:17 PM
Re: Valuable Assessment
About Equifax. If I recall correctly, they only had one individual responsible for patching which the executives tried to use as a scapegoat for the breach. I was baffled. But you'd be surprised how many organizations don't even have one person dedicated to patching. 
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/27/2019 | 6:39:42 PM
Re: Valuable Assessment
Unfortunately, too many companies continue under the methodology that they are not going to make changes until they are burnt by the stove. Agree. Most companies do not care until they get hit and of course they go out of business just after that.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/27/2019 | 6:36:57 PM
Re: Valuable Assessment
definitely complements the logic of prioritizing patching Makes sense. Prioritization may not be enough, all the know vulnerabilities should be closed in a timely manner I would guess.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/27/2019 | 6:34:20 PM
Re: Valuable Assessment
Equifax - case closed. Learn from a true master. Makes sense. We should try to apply all patches needed as a timely manner.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/27/2019 | 6:31:39 PM
Re: Valuable Assessment
SANS has stated that 90% of risk can be mitigated through patching That makes sense and I would agree with it. Patching is critical.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
1/27/2019 | 6:30:40 PM
691 M
681 million cyberattacks last year, according to analysts at cloud security provider Armor, This does not give any how big the number is. It needs to be compared to previous years to make sense.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
1/24/2019 | 5:18:15 PM
Re: Valuable Assessment
Yup, definitely complements the logic of priorizing patching. I guess from "learning from a true master" it aligns with the premise of a smart man learns from their own mistakes but a brilliant man learns from others. Unfortunately, too many companies continue under the methodology that they are not going to make changes until they are burnt by the stove.
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/24/2019 | 3:08:20 PM
Re: Valuable Assessment
Equifax - case closed.  Learn from a true master.
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