Attacks/Breaches
7/10/2014
10:32 AM
Connect Directly
Google+
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Chinese Hackers Target Logistics & Shipping Firms With Poisoned Inventory Scanners

'ZombieZero' still actively pushing rigged handheld scanning devices, reviving concerns of doing business with Chinese tech companies.

Malware-poisoned handheld inventory scanners from China are stealing information from logistics and shipping firms as well as manufacturing companies around the globe in an attack campaign dubbed "ZombieZero" by the researchers who discovered it.

A Chinese manufacturer that sells the popular devices for scanning items shipped or transported apparently has been implanting the malware in its products, as well as via the Windows XP embedded version of the software on the scanner maker's support website. Researchers from TrapX Security, which today provided details of the attacks, say scanners with another variant of the same malware were also sold to a large robotics firm and seven other companies, which they did not name.

Logistics firms use the scanners to track shipments as they are loaded and unloaded from ships, trucks, and airplanes.

"The attackers were exfiltrating all [stolen information] to a database," says Carl Wright, general manager of TrapX. "They are very focused on manifests -- what's in it, what's the value of it."

Once the scanner is connected to the victim's wireless network, it attacks the corporate network via the server message block (SMB) protocol, and the scanned information, including origin, destination, contents, value, and shipper and recipient information, is sent to a botnet that terminates at the Lanxiang Vocational School purportedly located in the Shangdong province in China. The school has been linked to the infamous Operation Aurora cyber espionage campaign that hit Google, Adobe, Intel, and many other major US firms more than four years ago, and is located one block from the inventory scanner manufacturer in question, according to TrapX.

The botnet then sends the scanner a second piece of malware that targets the victim's corporate financial, customer, shipping, and manifest information. "That was able to take control of the ERP [enterprise resource planning] system," he says. This would, among other things, allow the attacker to make a package "disappear" or "reappear," he says. The attack targets a specific, major ERP system, says Wright, who declined to reveal the name of the product due to an investigation into the attacks.

He says it's difficult to discern if the attackers are after the logistics firms themselves or their customers.

"The exfiltration of all financial data as well as CRM data was achieved providing the attacker complete situational awareness and visibility into the shipping and logistics targets worldwide operations," TrapX said in a report it published today on the attacks.

The poisoned inventory scanners echo previous concerns raised by the US government about doing business with Chinese technology companies. Huawei, Lenovo, and ZTE were among those firms called out by US officials in the past amid concerns their products could be backdoored with cyberspying malware.

"We notified the manufacturer of the said hardware and software. They denied culpability," Wright says. "And two days ago, we saw the same APT code had morphed and hit a couple of manufacturing companies looking for other things. The same codebase."

Meanwhile in a separate development, a GAO report (PDF) warned of the vulnerability of US shipping ports to cyberattack, according to a report today in the The Wall Street Journal. The GAO says the Department of Homeland Security must do more to shore up security in maritime and other ports.

"It has been recognized for some time that the administrative and controls systems networks at shipping ports are not only vulnerable, but high-priority targets for malicious activity. Particularly concerning is the threat terrorist organizations present to these networks and the physical and information networks that are present," says Mike Brown, vice president and general manager of the global public sector at RSA. "Over the past couple of years, DHS has begun to award funding [grants] to port authorities who prioritize cyber security efforts in their grant submissions."

Meantime, TrapX says one ZombieZero victim company running 48 inventory scanners from the unnamed Chinese manufacturer found that 16 of the devices were infected with the malware. A firewall sits between the inventory scanner wireless network and the corporate network at one of its sites, and the firewall blocked the initial attack attempt. But then came a second attack via the RADMIN protocol, or port 4899, that bypassed the firewall. Nine corporate servers were infected with the cyberspying malware. Its second site was defenseless -- no firewall -- so the attack went through SMB and infiltrated the corporate network and ERP servers, according to TrapX.

"All scanner attacks targeted very specific corporate servers. The attack looked for and compromised servers that had the word 'finance' in their Host name," according to the report.

TrapX today also released a free tool for forensics investigators called Threat Inspector. "We've cobbled together some top open source tools and put in a front-end wizard that will allow any engineer to get forensics reports off infected machines," TrapX's Wright says.

The full report on ZombieZero is available here.

 

Kelly Jackson Higgins is Executive Editor at DarkReading.com. She is an award-winning veteran technology and business journalist with more than two decades of experience in reporting and editing for various publications, including Network Computing, Secure Enterprise ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
CharlieM299
50%
50%
CharlieM299,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/11/2014 | 12:16:47 PM
Great way to kill your business with everyone in the world.
Who will want to buy anything from China with electronics in it?
Kelly Jackson Higgins
50%
50%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
7/11/2014 | 6:52:19 AM
Re: Supply Chain Attacks: Handheld Scanners to Datacenter Servers
Good point, @LUFU. I also think that politically, the US became a little less loud about it after the NSA revelations--specifically, TAO's ops.
LUFU
100%
0%
LUFU,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/10/2014 | 6:44:21 PM
Re: Supply Chain Attacks: Handheld Scanners to Datacenter Servers
@Kelly - I think concerns about using Chinese-made technology has never really abated, at least within the US defense industry. Where it has probably been downplayed somewhat has been within the commercial sector with security taking a backseat to doing business. That may change as the threats are exposed.
Kelly Jackson Higgins
100%
0%
Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
7/10/2014 | 4:21:42 PM
Re: Supply Chain Attacks: Handheld Scanners to Datacenter Servers
@CrypTodd, I definitely had the same thoughts. This definitely has shades of TAO techniques, but with what appears to be an interest in who's shipping what and to whom. I also wonder if it will revive concerns about using Chinese-made technology that could be tainted with malware. And you're right--bad guys looking to make a buck could also employ these same techniques (if they're not already). #supplychain 
CrypTodd01
100%
0%
CrypTodd01,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/10/2014 | 3:01:06 PM
Supply Chain Attacks: Handheld Scanners to Datacenter Servers
Super-interesting article - I have not seen much in the way of supply chain compromises until this news came along.  This same attack technique (modifying firmware to go after systems) could be used against other pieces of the IT supply chain (NIC cards, server firmware).  I think some of the NSA Tailored Access Operations (TAO) catalog had similar techniques.  It is simply a matter of time before bad guys use the techniques pioneered by sophisticated state actors against other pieces of IT infrastructure that contain sensitive information (if they are not doing so already).  IT shops had better start attesting the integrity of your infrastructure or risk having it compromised. 

CrypTodd
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading Must Reads - September 25, 2014
Dark Reading's new Must Reads is a compendium of our best recent coverage of identity and access management. Learn about access control in the age of HTML5, how to improve authentication, why Active Directory is dead, and more.
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2003-1598
Published: 2014-10-01
SQL injection vulnerability in log.header.php in WordPress 0.7 and earlier allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary SQL commands via the posts variable.

CVE-2011-4624
Published: 2014-10-01
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in facebook.php in the GRAND FlAGallery plugin (flash-album-gallery) before 1.57 for WordPress allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the i parameter.

CVE-2012-0811
Published: 2014-10-01
Multiple SQL injection vulnerabilities in Postfix Admin (aka postfixadmin) before 2.3.5 allow remote authenticated users to execute arbitrary SQL commands via (1) the pw parameter to the pacrypt function, when mysql_encrypt is configured, or (2) unspecified vectors that are used in backup files gene...

CVE-2012-5485
Published: 2014-09-30
registerConfiglet.py in Plone before 4.2.3 and 4.3 before beta 1 allows remote attackers to execute Python code via unspecified vectors, related to the admin interface.

CVE-2012-5486
Published: 2014-09-30
ZPublisher.HTTPRequest._scrubHeader in Zope 2 before 2.13.19, as used in Plone before 4.3 beta 1, allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary HTTP headers via a linefeed (LF) character.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio
Archived Dark Reading Radio
Chris Hadnagy, who hosts the annual Social Engineering Capture the Flag Contest at DEF CON, will discuss the latest trends attackers are using.