Attacks/Breaches
10/22/2012
04:52 PM
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Who Is Hacking U.S. Banks? 8 Facts

Hackers have labeled the bank website disruptions as grassroots-level reprisal for an anti-Islamic film. But is the Iranian government really backing the attacks?
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Why haven't leading banks, including Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, and Wells Fargo, been able to block the DDoS attacks launched against them, despite having prior warning? According to security experts, it's because the attackers appear to have compromised high-bandwidth servers--potentially at service providers--thus tapping enormous amounts of bandwidth, which they're using to launch their attacks.

The attacks illustrate the changing nature of DDoS attacks, which today are more prevalent and formidable than ever before. According to an October 2012 report from Prolexic, a DDoS protection and mitigation service provider, in the third quarter of 2012--compared to the same time period in 2011--the total number of DDoS attacks had increased 88% and the average attack bandwidth increased 230%, with attacks of 20 Gbps becoming the norm. Interestingly, however, the average attack duration decreased--between the third quarters of 2011 and 2012--from 33 hours to 19 hours.

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Leo Regulus
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Leo Regulus,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/24/2012 | 4:52:32 PM
re: Who Is Hacking U.S. Banks? 8 Facts
Very disappointed in Editor's choice of article format. This has been extensively discussed in the past.
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The cybersecurity profession struggles to retain women (figures range from 10 to 20 percent). It's particularly worrisome for an industry with a rapidly growing number of vacant positions.

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Is this really a problem at all? Are the low numbers simply an indication that women do not want to be in cybersecurity, and is it possible that more women will never want to be in cybersecurity? How many women would we need to see in the industry to declare success?

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