Attacks/Breaches
5/9/2012
11:21 AM
Connect Directly
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

Twitter Downplays Breach That Exposed Passwords

Nearly 60,000 Twitter usernames and passwords released via Pastebin, but social networking service says half are for blocked spam accounts or duplicates.

Tens of thousands of Twitter users' email addresses and passwords have been dumped online.

The leaked information, comprising 58,978 username and password combinations, appeared Monday on Pastebin. While Twitter said that it's investigating the breach, it’s also downplayed the supposed size and severity of the data dump.

"We are currently looking into the situation," said spokeswoman Rachel Bremer via email. "It's worth noting that, so far, we've discovered that the list of alleged accounts and passwords found on Pastebin consists of more than 20,000 duplicates, many spam accounts that have already been suspended, and many login credentials that do not appear to be linked (that is, the password and username are not actually associated with each other)."

Most hackers dumping data on Pastebin only divulge a subset of their data, then link to a torrent file for anyone who wants to download the entire data set. But in this case, whoever posted the data simply pasted the information across five different Pastebin posts. (Links: one, two, three, four, and five.) That was necessary since Pastebin imposes a 512 Kb limit on each post.

[ Are you ignoring common social media privacy controls and sharing risks? See Facebook Privacy: 5 Most Ignored Mistakes. ]

While Twitter is continuing its investigation, the company said it's already contacted affected users. "We have pushed out password resets to accounts that may have been affected," said Bremer. "For those who are concerned that their account may have been compromised, we suggest resetting your passwords and more in our Help Center."

Still, few Twitter users would have been affected by the breach. Based on Twitter's estimate of the number of invalid accounts contained in the data dump, and with the social network claiming to now have over 140 million active users, the breach would have affected about 0.02% of its user base.

Who leaked the Twitter account credentials, and why? Thanks to the Pastebin poster remaining anonymous, and no group stepping forward to take credit, that's not clear. But it's quite possible that the leaked credentials were gathered via phishing attacks, which would have tricked users into divulging their details. If so, that would exonerate Twitter and its information security practices.

That question is relevant because last year, as part of its settlement with the Federal Trade Commission settlement, Twitter agreed to improve its information security practices, undergo regular information security audits for 10 years, and avoid making any misleading statements about the effectiveness of its security or privacy practices for the next 20 years.

The settlement stems from an FTC charge that the social network "deceived consumers and put their privacy at risk by failing to safeguard their personal information," after hackers in 2009 twice gained full administrative control of the Twitter site.

As part of the settlement, which was first fielded by the FTC in 2010, Twitter agreed to designate employees to coordinate--as well as be accountable for--its information security and privacy programs. Twitter also agreed to put in place "reasonable safeguards" to mitigate any information security risks it identified, and to store data securely. But by the time the settlement was announced last year, Twitter said it had added almost all of the required security improvements.

Put an end to insider theft and accidental data disclosure with network and host controls--and don't forget to keep employees on their toes. Also in the new, all-digital Stop Data Leaks issue of Dark Reading: Why security must be everyone's concern, and lessons learned from the Global Payments breach. (Free registration required.)

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
JBUDDEMEYER000
50%
50%
JBUDDEMEYER000,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2012 | 6:28:14 PM
re: Twitter Downplays Breach That Exposed Passwords
would twitter actually admit the accounts had been accessed? the breach of privacy and security would be tantamount to chaos.
http://littlebiggy.org/4631847
Deb Donston-Miller
50%
50%
Deb Donston-Miller,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/9/2012 | 10:41:06 PM
re: Twitter Downplays Breach That Exposed Passwords
Just last week I started seeing a phishing scam in my email inbox, with a Twitter "follower" sending me a direct message saying that someone was "spreading bad rumors" about me. Now, the person whose account was clearly hacked is someone I work with, and I knew that he would never send me a message like that (especially one worded like that). So I knew it wasn't a legitimate message. But I know some teenagers who got the same message, and their Twitter followers might have used language like that. Luckily, my young friends were smart enough not to click on the link. But it's interesting to think about how a phish that doesn't work for one person might work for another or in another context.

Deb Donston-Miller
Contributing Editor, The BrainYard
timothytim
50%
50%
timothytim,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/25/2012 | 10:11:17 PM
re: Twitter Downplays Breach That Exposed Passwords
My Twitter account was compromised and subsequently suspended. The hacker sent out offensive tweets. I was able to get my account restored, but only after agreeing to not send any more offensive tweets. They won't respond to any request asking to clear the record from my account. In my case, I am 100% certain it was not by phishing. Reason: The email account that was on file at twitter was inactive and I had not updated my twitter account. I did not receive any other twitter related messages at other email accounts. If I am one, you know there are lots (ten's of thousands) of others who also were not phished. And what is the blah blah "Twitter was not compromised" about? If Twitter's customers were compromised then Twitter was compromised. Twitter doesn't exist without its customers. Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain.
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Cartoon
Current Issue
Dark Reading, September 16, 2014
Malicious software is morphing to be more targeted, stealthy, and destructive. Are you prepared to stop it?
Flash Poll
Video
Slideshows
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2012-1032
Published: 2014-09-17
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in the Euroling SiteSeeker module 3.x before 3.4.5 for EPiServer allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via unspecified vectors. NOTE: the provenance of this information is unknown; the details are obtained solely from third party inf...

CVE-2012-1417
Published: 2014-09-17
Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in Local Phone book and Blacklist form in Yealink VOIP Phones allow remote authenticated users to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the user field to cgi-bin/ConfigManApp.com.

CVE-2012-1506
Published: 2014-09-17
SQL injection vulnerability in the updateStatus function in lib/models/benefits/Hsp.php in OrangeHRM before 2.7 allows remote authenticated users to execute arbitrary SQL commands via the hspSummaryId parameter to plugins/ajaxCalls/haltResumeHsp.php. NOTE: some of these details are obtained from th...

CVE-2012-1507
Published: 2014-09-17
Multiple cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerabilities in OrangeHRM before 2.7 allow remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the (1) newHspStatus parameter to plugins/ajaxCalls/haltResumeHsp.php, (2) sortOrder1 parameter to templates/hrfunct/emppop.php, or (3) uri parameter to index...

CVE-2012-2583
Published: 2014-09-17
Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in Mini Mail Dashboard Widget plugin 1.42 for WordPress allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary web script or HTML via the body of an email.

Best of the Web
Dark Reading Radio