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Password Manager Service LastPass Investigating Possible Database Breach

Users must change master passwords -- but not all right now.

The "last password you'll ever need" now requires a reset: LastPass is forcing users of the password manager service to change the single master password they created for accessing websites, virtual private networks, and Web mail accounts via the tool. The move comes in response to the company's discovery of unusual network activity around one of its databases.

LastPass says it detected a "network traffic anomaly" in a noncritical server that led to the discovery of a similar problem with its database that houses email addresses and salted password hashes: More traffic was going out of the server than was going in.

"Because we can't account for this anomaly either, we're going to be paranoid and assume the worst: that the data we stored in the database was somehow accessed. We know roughly the amount of data transferred and that it's big enough to have transferred people's email addresses, the server salt, and their salted password hashes from the database. We also know that the amount of data taken isn't remotely enough to have pulled many users encrypted data blobs," LastPass said in its company blog.

Joe Siegrist, CEO of LastPass, told Dark Reading that this doesn't appear to be the result of a SQL injection attack because there aren't any "large or suspicious Web requests in the Web logs."

"We don't know details. We know that there was traffic we can't account for, so we're taking a 'worst possible scenario' view, which we think is appropriate," Siegrist says. "We are not emailing users. We lock them out if they're not coming from a known IP, and then redirecting [them] to a URL explaining [why]."

Users with strong passwords that are not dictionary-based should be safe: The biggest threat is an attacker brute-force hacking master passwords and then using that to get to users' data, according to LastPass. But erring on the side of caution, the company is forcing all users to change master passwords, and is also checking IPs and validating emails to ensure the users are who they say are, just in case.

Read the rest of this article on Dark Reading.

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