Attacks/Breaches

Angry Birds Site Toppled After Surveillance Report

Syrian Electronic Army ally allegedly defaces Rovio's Angry Birds website over reports that company shared user data with US and UK surveillance agencies.

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Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/31/2014 | 6:11:14 AM
Re: Not the first & certainly not the last app to spy
norris, 

There is basic principle that everybody seems to be forgetting. If you don't want something to be known you keep it secret. You don't go giving the information you consider too private to every single application you download.

When you don't want people to know something you don't talk about it publicly, i.e. the Internet. 

So why people complain when their marrital status and location, for instance, are revealed when it was them the ones who posted the information on the Internet? 

The fact that Facebook, or an app asks for certain information doesn't mean you have to give it away, does it? 

-Susan
Susan Fourtané
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Susan Fourtané,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/31/2014 | 6:04:27 AM
Re: Game over
Shane, 

I believe what Makael Hed, CEO of Rovio, said: "We do not collaborate, collude, or share data with spy agencies anywhere in the world." 

I don't think I am mistaken in saying that you can trust Rovio. 

Rovio has been a victim just as many other companies have been. 

-Susan
norris1231
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norris1231,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/29/2014 | 10:05:38 PM
Re: Not the first & certainly not the last app to spy
I like your second point as well.  Many users freely give information with reading the small print.  Everything is instant for us today and we do not want to take the time to even read the agreement portion of the apps.  Information will continue to be stolen from users as long as they refuse to take the time and read the small print.
norris1231
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norris1231,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/29/2014 | 9:58:23 PM
Re: Not the first & certainly not the last app to spy
Nice points!  The sad part comes in two forms for me.  The first form is that users don't realize this prior to entering their personal info into various apps.  The second part is that companies actually take your personal information and communicate it to third party sites.  We must be open minded and realize that Hackers are all around us at all times.
norris1231
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norris1231,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/29/2014 | 9:55:10 PM
Re: Game over
It's amazing to me that you can even play a simple game anymore.  I know plenty of individuals (Mostly women) who go crazy over the Angry Birds game.  Hackers have found a way to steal personal info from simple games now.  However, hackers also know who and what to target.  This isn't out of the norm; they just caught many individuals with their pants down with this hacking scheme.  The home page was total re-arranged by the hackers leaving many wondering if the site will ever be safe again.  A nice site to visit is Fox News.com website Source: http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2014/01/29/angry-birds-site-hacked-after-surveillance-claims/
Shane M. O'Neill
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Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/29/2014 | 4:59:10 PM
Game over
Most mobile apps provide great content and usability and we consume them like hungry wolves without thinking about our data being collected and spread to ad networks, or worse, being intercepted by spy agencies. This isn't fun anymore.
asksqn
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asksqn,
User Rank: Ninja
1/29/2014 | 4:45:15 PM
Not the first & certainly not the last app to spy
I find it amusing/sad at the same time to note that a game was responsible for drawing the ire of privacy advocates.  The fact is, any mobile app will collect user info and transmit it back to the mother ship without user knowledge. (Apple gives users the ability to determine what phones home while Android just nuked the feature on its latest platform version.)  Of course, the app maker will point out that in order to install the app in the first place, the user first had to agree to give it carte blanche access, and, since most don't bother to read exactly what they are agreeing to, we have wholesale spying going on directly under the noses of the mobile device using public. 
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