Attacks/Breaches
3/14/2014
03:00 PM
Becca Lipman
Becca Lipman
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7 Behaviors That Could Indicate A Security Breach

Breaches create outliers. Identifying anomalous activity can help keep firms in compliance and out of the headlines.

Here's a rather uncontested statement: In the world of cybersecurity, there are many things that can go wrong.

Some breaches are intentional, others accidental. A case in which an employee unwittingly discloses confidential information or is working from an infected machine may look similar to the actions of employee who has gone rogue by uploading or downloading inappropriate data.

Regardless of its cause, determining whether a behavior is normal or not is important when it comes to detecting a variety of security breaches.

Skyhigh Networks compiled the following real-world examples of behaviors that security teams identified as several standard deviations outside of normal activity.

Read the rest of this article on Wall Street & Technology.

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pfretty
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pfretty,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/17/2014 | 3:32:50 PM
Not just staying out of headlines, but avoiding the costs
It's crucial to pay close attention to the warning signs. According to the Ponemon 2013 Cost of Cyber Crime Report (http://www.hpenterprisesecurity.com/ponemon-study-2013), the average company experiences 100+ attacks per year at a cost of $11.6 million. These make breaches not just cause embrassment, but in many instances can be crippling to even the most otherwise stable organizations. Fighting off attacks starts with strategy and technology and continues to improve through education. 

 

Peter Fretty, IDG blogger working on behalf of HP
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