Application Security

4/9/2018
12:11 PM
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CA Acquires SourceClear

CA adds software composition analysis capabilities to Veracode lineup through acquisition.

CA has announced the acquisition of SourceClear, a software composition analysis (SCA) firm founded by Mark Curphey, the creator of OWASP. SCA identifies third-party and open-source components used in applications and informs development teams about the licenses and libraries, including those that should be upgraded or patched. In particular, SCA will alert the development team to any open-source frameworks have open CVEs that must be addressed.

SourceClear's SaaS-based tool looks not only at the libraries bound to the project but whether vulnerable components are being used by the application. According to CA, this capability will allow developers to focus their attention on vulnerabilities that are most likely to have an impact on the project and its users.

SourceClear data-mines commits (formal changes) in open-source libraries, watches bug-trackers, and parses the change-logs of commonly used libraries, in addition to tracking public sources such as CVEs. This may allow customers to find vulnerabilities that have not yet been reported to NVD. In each case, SourceClear includes prescriptive fix information.

In a statement, CA said that it plans to ultimately integrate SourceClear fully into the Veracode cloud platform.

For more, read here.

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