Operations //

Identity & Access Management

1/20/2015
04:30 PM
Sara Peters
Sara Peters
Quick Hits
Connect Directly
Twitter
RSS
E-Mail
50%
50%

'123456' & 'Password' Are The 2 Most Common Passwords, Again

New entrants to the top 25 show that bad password creators are fans of sports, superheroes, dragons, and NSFW numeral combos.

"123456" and "password" continue to be the two most common passwords found on the Internet, thus reining SplashData's annual "Worst Password List" for the fourth year in a row. New entrants to the top 25 this year show that bad password creators are fans of sports, superheroes, dragons, and not-safe-for-work numeral combinations.

This is the fourth year SplashData has identified the most popular passwords by compiling sets of credentials leaked online. This year's study looked at more than 3.3 million leaked passwords, mostly from users in North America and Western Europe. 

"The bad news from my research is that this year's most commonly used passwords are pretty consistent with prior years,” said Mark Burnett, author of “Perfect Passwords,” who worked with SplashData on this year's study.

“The good news," says Burnett, "is that it appears that more people are moving away from using these passwords. In 2014, the top 25 passwords represented about 2.2% of passwords exposed. While still frightening, that's the lowest percentage of people using the most common passwords I have seen in recent studies."

Nine of the top twenty-five most common passwords were all numerals, and fourteen of them were all lowercase letters. The other two were a combination of lowercase letters and numerals ("abc123" and "trustno1").

Not a single capital letter or special character made the cut. Most of the common passwords were no more than six characters long. Nine of the top 25 choices were simply dictionary words. All this shows that few places are enforcing any kind of strong password policy.

New to the top 25 were "baseball" and "football." Other lowercase sports and sports teams were found in the top 100. For the more whimsical security-unsavvy users, "dragon," "superman," and "batman" jumped into the top 25 also.

In addition to "password," which ranked second, users were fond of "letmein," "trustno1," and "access," which is new to the list.

No swear words made it into the top 25, but SplashData says they remain popular. The password "iloveyou," which was in the top 25 last year, has fallen off the list entirely, "696969" has taken its place.

Sara Peters is Senior Editor at Dark Reading and formerly the editor-in-chief of Enterprise Efficiency. Prior that she was senior editor for the Computer Security Institute, writing and speaking about virtualization, identity management, cybersecurity law, and a myriad ... View Full Bio

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
RyanSepe
50%
50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
1/21/2015 | 10:23:57 AM
System Administrators and Policy Configurations
I think options are the worst part of creating a password. UserID's and passwords are in nature restrictive. Restrictive to the assets and information they provide to the owner. I think responsibility of password complexity needs to shift to site and system administrators as well as any person who is responsible for password configuration policies. This restrictive nature needs to be encompassed throughout the password policy. It's a widely regarded human nature to try and take the quickest, easiest route possible. But if the easiest route possible is a complex password than the user has no other option then to be compliant and try to be secure.


Policy Configuration factors: length, alphanumeric & special character, password life, and password retention (not using the same password until a certain amount of new passwords have been derived), etc.
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/21/2015 | 8:30:06 AM
Re: Blame the networking vendor amongst the other things
That's outrageuos @tompiotrowski. Thanks for pointing out that end users aren't the only one culpable in nor taking basic security best practices seriously enough.
tompiotrowski
100%
0%
tompiotrowski,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/20/2015 | 11:00:40 PM
Blame the networking vendor amongst the other things
Have you ever purchased simple or complex networking device?  Switch, router, DSL gateway etc?  Cisco, D-Link, Belkin, just to name few are supplying the products with a rather "sophisticated" administrator logins:  ADMIN and PASSWORD.  Whilst the end users cannot be cleared from responsibility of keeping their accounts secure, the "examples" set by industry leaders are equally to blame.   
Printers: The Weak Link in Enterprise Security
Kelly Sheridan, Associate Editor, Dark Reading,  10/16/2017
20 Questions to Ask Yourself before Giving a Security Conference Talk
Joshua Goldfarb, Co-founder & Chief Product Officer, IDDRA,  10/16/2017
Why Security Leaders Can't Afford to Be Just 'Left-Brained'
Bill Bradley, SVP, Cyber Engineering and Technical Services, CenturyLink,  10/17/2017
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Security Vulnerabilities: The Next Wave
Just when you thought it was safe, researchers have unveiled a new round of IT security flaws. Is your enterprise ready?
Flash Poll
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
New Best Practices for Secure App Development
The transition from DevOps to SecDevOps is combining with the move toward cloud computing to create new challenges - and new opportunities - for the information security team. Download this report, to learn about the new best practices for secure application development.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2017-0290
Published: 2017-05-09
NScript in mpengine in Microsoft Malware Protection Engine with Engine Version before 1.1.13704.0, as used in Windows Defender and other products, allows remote attackers to execute arbitrary code or cause a denial of service (type confusion and application crash) via crafted JavaScript code within ...

CVE-2016-10369
Published: 2017-05-08
unixsocket.c in lxterminal through 0.3.0 insecurely uses /tmp for a socket file, allowing a local user to cause a denial of service (preventing terminal launch), or possibly have other impact (bypassing terminal access control).

CVE-2016-8202
Published: 2017-05-08
A privilege escalation vulnerability in Brocade Fibre Channel SAN products running Brocade Fabric OS (FOS) releases earlier than v7.4.1d and v8.0.1b could allow an authenticated attacker to elevate the privileges of user accounts accessing the system via command line interface. With affected version...

CVE-2016-8209
Published: 2017-05-08
Improper checks for unusual or exceptional conditions in Brocade NetIron 05.8.00 and later releases up to and including 06.1.00, when the Management Module is continuously scanned on port 22, may allow attackers to cause a denial of service (crash and reload) of the management module.

CVE-2017-0890
Published: 2017-05-08
Nextcloud Server before 11.0.3 is vulnerable to an inadequate escaping leading to a XSS vulnerability in the search module. To be exploitable a user has to write or paste malicious content into the search dialogue.